Building the Future

Keynote

The world(s) we might inhabit as new technologies appear and are adopted, adapted and sometimes abandoned.

“In 1965, Gordon Moore wrote an essay predicting the future of integrated circuits, not something that was on everyone’s lips. But he made big claims for those little pieces of technology. In part, he wrote: ‘Integrated circuits will lead to such wonders as home computers – or at least terminal connected to a central computer – automatic controls for automobiles and personal portable communication equipment. The electronic watch only needs a display to be feasible today.’ His vision of the technological future would be eclipsed by his articulation of a growth rate of those underlying circuits. We know that rate now as “Moores Law”, and it is the heart beat of Silicon Valley.

I work in the company that keeps Moores Law, and we spend a lot of time there thinking about and building toward the future. However, this is not a talk about technology or product or product design per se. Rather, it is about the world/s we might inhabit as new technologies appear and are adopted, adapted and sometimes abandoned. The future of compute feels overwhelming; there are lots and lots of new technologies, devices, services, applications. This talk traces out some of the different ways technology will unfold over the next decade: How might we make sense of it all, and how will we experience it?”

– Genevieve Bell 


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